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The final push

19 Jul

Preparations and making products for the upcoming Bloomfest has been consuming our apartment and our lives for the past month, and although I’m really really super excited for our first ever physical store/booth, I can’t help but be just as excited for when it’s all over. I’m so worried that I won’t have enough items to fill the 10’x10′ booth and that it’ll look so boring…a lot of the layout and design will have to be done the day of, as we’d like to do some sort of radial string display with the canopy and I’m not sure if that’s possible at all. I really need to make a SketchUp mockup of the tent…

Anyway, here’s where you can find our booth on July 23rd, from 2pm to 10pm:

Orderly Civilians Bloomfest LA 2011 booth layout

There we are!

I’ve only been thinking about the booth design with a middle booth in mind and so the news that we have a corner booth has thrown me off. I hear that corner booths are usually the most desirable booth location as you will receive maximum exposure, but I’m a bit anxious about how to present such a space and how to fill it. Whereas a booth in between two others only has one side to face, a corner booth has two that need to be addressed and is not quite as controlled. So, back to the drawing board…

But it’s slowly and surely coming together. Here’s a few camera phone pictures of our works in progress:

Apple rings display

Apple rings display

Globe ring holder display

Globe rings display

Minions hard at work, workshop

Minions hard at work

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Getting ready for BloomfestLA

13 Jul

Things have been crazy over here in the workshop. There’s only 11 more days until Bloomfest and there’s still so much to be done. Rings, scarves and necklaces to be made, banners to be printed, booth decor and lighting to be figured out…

Here’s the official BloomfestLA poster, designed by Christine Hale. Isn’t it great?

Bloomfest poster

Cute!

In other news, I trekked over to the fashion district today and we now have 3 new chain styles available for necklaces! If you’d like to purchase an apple necklace with one of these chains pictured below, please send us a message at info@orderlycivilians.com!

New necklace chain styles available

New necklace chain styles available

 

Best engagement photo shoot, ever.

8 Jul

The super cute blog cozyhunter.com (who also win for best wedding ever and best wedding video ever) spotlighted the best engagement shoot ever today, and I wanted to share it because it’s pure genius.

You Can't Be Serious engagement photos of Janet & Darrell

Images from You Can't Be Serious photography - Hailey and Andrew Bartholomew

I’ve always thought that engagement shoots were just an excuse for coupley glamour shots, but who can resist the infectious joy of giant bear heads? I’ve seen a few couples with giant blown up engagement or wedding pictures in their newlywed homes and it’s alway a bit…cheesy. But how amazing would the shopping cart or construction site look on a mantelpiece?

Go now to www.youcantbeserious.com.au and bask in their creativity.

LOVE!

New Facebook url!

6 Jul

We now have an easy to remember & type Facebook page:

http://www.facebook.com/OrderlyCivilians

Thanks to all 25 ‘likers’ for making it possible!

Ham & Pea’s Spell it with Pasta Collection!

5 Jul

Ham & Pea Design & Paperie is the work of Li-Ann Scott, over in Australia. One of the kindest and most open-minded people I know, Li-Ann also has the distinction of being the childhood friend that I’ve known the longest and it’s hard to reconcile the now busy and energetic mother of twin boys and with the Troll doll loving girl who would come to our My Little Pony-themed birthday parties. She’s always been super-creative and talented, sending us these elaborately drawn penpal letters with ribbons and stickers, so it seems only inevitable that she’d capitalize on that talent and launch a successful card and graphic design business!

I recently won a giveaway on Ham & Pea’s Facebook page for a collection of the ‘Spell it with Pasta’ greeting cards and was so excited when they arrived!

Ham & Pea Spell it With Pasta greeting card collection, wrapped

Perfectly packaged!

Ham & Pea Spell it with Pasta collection greeting cards

The collection

Ham & Pea Spell it with Pasta greeting card collection

Back of card detail

I really love this collection as it’s both cute and clever. The attention to detail is amazing, with the design theme of each card continuing on the back of the card, where it’s usually boring.

Ham & Pea Spell it with Pasta greeting card envelope

Even the envelope interiors are designed!

 

Prior to starting Ham & Pea, Li-Ann was also working as an architect in Australia. Architecture is often a thankless field and so it’s amazing to see how my friends in the industry have expanded their interests into other creative avenues.

Ham & Pea is having a sale this week only (July 6th – 12th), so head on over to their Facebook page for details and a sale album!

Red Delicious apple ring giveaway!

1 Jul

Jewelry by Janelle!

The lovely Janelle of LoveJewelrybyJ is hosting a giveaway of one of our Red Delicious apple rings on her blog! The contest ends 7/10/2011, so be sure to enter soon!

Red Delicious apple ring by Orderly Civilians

Red Delicious Apple ring for a lucky winner!

Best of luck to you all, and be sure to check out the 15% off coupon code as well! Enter the giveaway here!

Go-go-gocco!

30 Jun

My lovely Gocco arrived a few weeks ago, and it’s been such a great tool to have. It’s so much fun and terribly easy to use that I’ve decided that it’s just about the best investment I could make for a tiny business’s printing needs.

Print Gocco kit

This is the kit I bought off eBay, image by eBay seller import_express445106

So far, I’ve printed tiny muslin bags, business cards and mini Moo-sized cards that will debut at Bloomfest on the 23rd. I’d like to purchase some kraft paper merchandise bags and print our logo and QR code, but that’s for a bit later.

Printing Orderly Civilians business cards on the Print Gocco

Printing Orderly Civilians business cards on the Print Gocco, front and back, two at a time

New Orderly Civilians business cards on chocolate cardstock

Finished business cards drying in the sun

Muslin bags printed on the Gocco

Mini muslin bags for rings and necklaces

Mini moo business cards

Moo-sized mini business cards

I’m really pleased that I decided to go with the Gocco over the Yudu as it’s much smaller and thus more suited to the items that I will be making. As I’m doing very repetitive projects, I also find that the stamping (or pressing down) action of the Gocco is much easier than repeatedly pulling a squeegee across a screen. I was also pleasantly surprised at the fineness of lines that is achievable on the Gocco which allows for beautifully legible type. However, (as seen in the image above) the screens tend to expose a little unevenly, giving an imperfect and distressed look, which isn’t all that bad in my opinion.

I purchased the PG-10 Super Gocco model because I liked the idea of a repositionable platten and the registration plate that it came with, which allows exact placement of multiple-stage prints and was cheaper than the PG-11, which has the same features plus a lamp housing that is supposed to be better angled to expose the edges of the screen. If you’re interested in purchasing a Gocco, here’s a great chart that breaks down the various models. Here’s a video that shows the registration process with the PG-11:

One of the cons of Goccos is that the master screens aren’t reusable and cleaning isn’t very easy. The inks require a special cleaner (although I’ve heard that one can use Goop hand cleaner or vegetable cooking oil, but I’ve not tried either) and it’s really not fun or easy as the screens are cardboard and hard to rinse out. I also tend to load up my screens so I can print multiple projects at different times with one master and the ink blocking that keeps colors separated tends to get saturated with ink and comes off in the cleaning process, which is a bit wasteful. I’ve also ruined part of a master by forgetting to put a piece on paper on the part of the sticky pad that I wasn’t using at the time, which led to the non-printing film on the mesh being pulled off the mesh and rendering that part unusable.

Here’s a great video on YouTube created by Etsy that shows how to use a Gocco for a simple, hand illustrated card:

I havent tried a hand-drawn print, yet and usually I lay out the screen in Adobe Illustrator before printing it out on a laser printer. The image to be exposed needs to be drawn with carbon-based ink, which most inkjet printers don’t use, although HP inks supposedly do contain carbon. I haven’t tried it out because our HP printer is quite old (8 years and counting!) and doesn’t like to print straight lines anymore, so it’s off to Kinkos I go.

What are you printing with your Gocco?

BYOContainer

23 Jun

I’m at my parents’ house today, and one of the best things ever (besides delicious food that I don’t have to cook) is blogging with a friend:

Sushi the tabby cat

Sushicat!

In other news, over at Re-Nest.com today is a post about In.gredients, an Austin, TX based micro-grocery store that privileges sustainability and follows in the footsteps of UK’s Unpackaged by encouraging customers to bring in their own containers to hold groceries such as grain, beans, flour and eggs.

 

In.gredient’s system (which they refer to as ‘precycling’) has the customer bring in their own containers, weigh it for tare, fill it with their food of choice, weigh again and pay for the difference in weight of their filled container. Although the bulk bin section at conventional supermarkets (candy, usually, unless it’s Whole Foods or nutritional stores) is nothing new, customers at these ‘normal’ stores are discouraged from bringing in their own containers and must use disposable plastic bags and twist ties. Even though it may seem novel to a generation raised to abhor non-boxed food (did anyone ever eat bagged Malt-O-Meal cereal?), In.gredients points out that bringing one’s own containers to the store is nothing new. In the past, food bought in markets was commonly taken home in burlap sacks and baskets, a tradition that continues in some mostly third world and developing countries where waste is sacrilegious. It’s something that I can definitely get behind, as I really like the idea of bulk bins, but I’ll admit that there’s something disconcerting about the system as is. Perhaps it’s the idea that the food is sitting out in bins that aren’t air-tight or that people’s hands could possibly have wandered through my rice that gets to me. I also hate getting home and have to dump the contents of my saggy, unstructured plastic baggie into yet another container, only to trash the now dirty plastic bag. It’s great, though, to have the option of buying as much or as little as you want, which allows me to try small quantities of dry goods such as nutritional yeast or steel cut oats (which I still haven’t finished). And if I’m to be completely honest, buying from the bulk bins also includes the added benefit of allowing me to share self-important, do-gooder smiles with my fellow bin-ers.

The BYOContainer system is appealing for these reasons (although perhaps not the open air, handled part), and it’s a wonder that it hasn’t caught on as quickly as one would imagine, given Unpackaged’s success with the 20-30 yuppie green crowd in London and the lowered cost of not providing plastic bags. It does, however, seem more labor intensive as I’d imagine that all that weighing and bin filling must require more attention than individually packaged and barcoded items. Sanitary issues that arise from customers who bring in improperly cleaned containers may also factor in, and it would certainly turn me off my egg-buying if I glanced over and saw caked on cheese stains in my neighbor’s Weck jar.

But let’s address the issue that In.gredients is not completely packaging free. Even though the brand’s mission is to support local business and agriculture, these grains and eggs and beers do have to arrive to the store in some kind of packaging and it’s doubtful that their register paper or disinfectant will arrive unpackaged. I may be nitpicking, but to make a claim that one is zero-packaging is pretty loaded. Sure enough, the company acknowledges that, at the core, grocery stores are all about convenience, and it’s not always convenient to haul 30 jars to the store. To this end, they plan on providing compostable containers and point out that there are certain foods, such as meat, which must be packaged for food safety.

This topic is especially timely for me as I’ve been reading Michael Pollan’s impressive book An Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals and finding myself questioning the way I’ve been eating. I’ve been thinking about the implications of what we eat and how we eat it, and packaging is an important part of the equation. While it’s hard to imagine that In.gredients will completely live up to its lofty goals of being a completely sustainable marketplace, it’s heartening to see that there are alternatives to the processed food-laden big boxes and corporate supermarkets and I believe that fundamentally, this shift in approach (embracing and accommodating customer-provided packaging vs. forbidding it) is a step forward, rather than sideways.

P.S. I can’t say enough good things about An Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals. It’s imaginative and tackles many contemporary issues about food culture, from sustainable farming to foraging and the eternal vegetarian/carnivore debate. He makes intelligent points for both sides of each issue and I can’t help but admire someone willing to take on the ethical challenge of slaughtering one’s food and the awareness of species that it implies. It’s really a love-letter to the food chain that brings everything I learned in last year’s ecology  class to bear. Please, read it.

P.P.S. Here’s author Michael Pollan, talking about food chains:

News of the day

12 Jun

We’re super excited to announce that we’ve been selected to exhibit at the Bloomfest LA music + street art + food festival on July 23rd! It’ll run from 2pm until 10pm and it’s free to attend. The theme of the fair will be sustainable urban living, and will feature “live indie music, great brews, good food, and eco-friendly fun.”

BloomfestLA Street art, music, food, arts & crafts

 

It will be held in the Downtown Arts District area at 3rd St. & Traction Ave. near Wurstküche, Zip Fusion Sushi, K-Town BBQ, Angel City Brewing, just east of Little Tokyo and adjacent to SCI-Arc. I used to work in the area and I’m thrilled to be back on my old stomping grounds for our first ever physical selling opportunity. We’ve been kicking around great ideas for booth decor and I really CAN’T WAIT.

To pile on even more win, one of my favorite local bands, Love Grenades, will be playing. I’m not sure if I’ll have time to check them out (I sortfof hope I don’t, because that means that we’ll be busy), but they’ve got a quasi-retro bossa nova-ish lounge/dance pop sound and I can’t get enough.

There’s so much to do before then, though, and I’m hoping to have at least 100 rings and necklaces done by then. I’m also developing some new items, but I’m waiting on supplies to come. Oh! I caved and bought a Gocco printer to print labels and business cards! I hope that it comes soon and in good condition, since it’s coming all the way from Japan.

Also, brilliant Michael has set up our domain to reroute to the Orderly Civilians Etsy store for the time being, so I’m pleased to announce that www.orderlycivilians.com is now live! We’ll be working on a site that brings together our blog, store and catalog soon.

On Steve Jobs’s presentation to the Cupertino City Council

8 Jun

Steve Jobs’s recent presentation to the Cupertino City Council on the unveiling of a new, complementary Apple campus was really heartening to see. Not only because of Apple’s reputed choice of architect in Sir Norman Foster, but because it showed that with a lot of practice and memorization, anyone can be a great speaker.

In comparison with his widely broadcast, super slick keynote speeches touting the latest and greatest from Apple, Jobs’s presentation to the city was noticeably less polished and rehearsed. He glanced at his notes, he stammered. He paused to search for words. It was, in every sense, a very real and human presentation. Perhaps the WWDC keynote he delivered on Monday unveiling iCloud, etc. had taken all his energy and left him very little time to prepare for the council address and he was somewhat unfamiliar with the subject matter at hand (architecture and landscape). The slideshow that he presented didn’t seem to be done in-house and contained very little information beyond what the building looked like (a ring), how many trees there were (‘indigenous’) and how many people would be accommodated. While he artfully dodged silly questions and evaded harder ones like a champion, Jobs’s true standout moment was when he related the cutesy tale of his summer job at the Hewlett Packard campus. In that moment, it is clear that he is in his element. The most effective presentations are those that tell a story, and here, Jobs knows everything there is to know about his longstanding relationship with the site and it comes through. He becomes more articulate and more confident. His voice takes on a soothing quality and he doesn’t need to look at his notes. He’s a great communicator and is able to project so much likeability and humility that he can make you believe in him, his silly little ring, and that one day, Apple’s new infinite loop is going to be the Salk Institute of the Silicon Valley.

(I don’t really know if I believe that, but with Foster at helm, it’s certainly possible.)

Carmine Gallo’s slideshow on Jobs’s presentation secrets contends that Jobs is not a natural born speaker, which I agree with. What he is, however, is a manic pursuer of excellence. Gallo notes that the two days prior to each keynote are spent going over his presentation, practicing and practicing, committing every word to memory and finding exactly the right tone and balance. Inasmuch as Apple’s tech gadgets go through refinement and testing, so do his presentations.

It’s not a gift, and it’s not even a secret. I’ve been told that I’m a confident presenter and the last firm I worked with pursued me ferociously and gave me great opportunities because I was able to convince them of that during the interview process. But I’m actually not, never knowing what to say to people. I’m a nervous wreck before and during each presentation, and most of it is an act, for in my heart, I’m a shy little crab who would rather stay home and knit something. But I do think that what I do well is that I am able to convince myself that I DO like the attention and I DO know everything there is to know about ___, and perhaps that comes through to the audience. I try to explain my work in the same way that one would tell a story–with logic, clarity, and cohesiveness that flows easily from one thought to another. I try to lay out my presentation materials in the same manner, so that if I forget, they prompt me to remember the script. I don’t think I’m a great actor, but I suppose that great presenters are by necessity actors, especially if they weren’t fortunate enough to be born with the innate talent of speech. The keys to being a great presenter are then conviction, writing it down (verbatim), memorization, practice, and a little bit of friendly swagger.

Here’s Mr. Jobs’s council presentation and a clip from the WWDC keynote for comparison:

 

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